About Marc Latamie

Over the years, Martinique-born artist Marc Latamie has shared his work through a wide variety of exhibitions, installations, and publications. With work currently on display as the second in three exhibitions comprising the Americas Society’s For Rent series, Marc Latamie presents pieces that examine and re-conceptualize cultural perceptions.

His career began in Paris in the 1970s as a student in the Art History and Visual Art departments at Université Paris 8. Marc Latamie received his license from the Université in 1978, when he was already the holder of a Lecturer position at the Musée National d’Art Moderne. Since then, Mr. Latamie has held many lecturer and visiting professor positions in Europe and the United States, which he carries out while creating his own considerable body of work.

Marc Latamie has received exhibitions in major cities throughout Europe, Asia, and the Americas. In 2005, his work earned inclusion in the Peabody Essex Museum’s 2005 show, Island Thresholds: Contemporary Art from the Caribbean, an exhibition aimed at re-conceptualizing art through the work of four Caribbean artists. His work also appeared in the 2002 show Evoking History: Memory of Water and Memory of Land during the Spoletto Festival in Charleston, South Carolina. He constructed a monumental display of two tons of refined sugar during the 23rd Bienal of São Paulo in Brazil. Mr. Latamie has also contributed pieces to major art review publications and books, including an extensive interview about Trade and Globalization in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Art in 2002 and an essay in Changing States: Contemporary Art and Ideas in an Era of Globalization, an anthology published by INIVA, the Institute of International Visual Arts in London.

Mr. Latamie maintains a particular interest in installation and assemblage art. He continues to create work, conduct research, and present lectures while maintaining residences in New York City and Paris.

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